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5 Best RV Tires

 


Most recommended
Carlisle Radial Trail HD Trailer
  • Brand Carlisle Paddles
  • Section Width 235 Millimeters
  • Load Capacity 1200 Pounds
A good choice too
Maxxis M8008 ST Radial Trailer Tire
  • Brand MAXXIS
  • Load Capacity 2830 Pounds
  • Rim Width 225 Millimeters
A good choice too
Carlisle Radial Trail HD Trailer Tire-205/75R15
  • Brand Carlisle Paddles
  • Section Width 205 Millimeters
  • Load Capacity 1200 Pounds
Americana 1HP52 Loadstar K399 205/65-10 Bias
  • Fits: 10″ x 6″ rims
  • Load Range: C
  • Maximum load: 1,100 lbs
Kenda Bias ST215/75D14 LRC K550 Trailer
  • Loadstar
  • 1ST90
  • Department : Mens

Choose the Best RV Tires

Customer’s Choice: the Best Rated RV Tire

9 users answered this survey. Please help us improve this review!

22.22% of users selected Carlisle Radial Trail HD Trailer, 55.56% selected Maxxis M8008 ST Radial Trailer Tire, 22.22% selected Carlisle Radial Trail HD Trailer Tire-205/75R15, 0.00% selected Americana 1HP52 Loadstar K399 205/65-10 Bias and 0.00% selected Kenda Bias ST215/75D14 LRC K550 Trailer. Every month we analyze your answers and change our rating.

If you’re in the market for a new set of RV tires, you’re in luck. In this epic buying guide, we will answer all of your questions and help you find the best tires for your needs. We’ll start by discussing the different types of RV tires available and what to consider when making your purchase. Then, we’ll provide an overview of some popular brands and their products. Finally, we’ll offer some valuable tips to help you get the most out of your new tires.

We’ve compiled a list of the top 5 RV tires available on the market today. In this guide, we’ll answer common questions about RV tires, provide product reviews, and offer tips for choosing the right tires for your vehicle.

Table of Contents

Carlisle RV Radial Trail Tire 6H04631

The Carlisle Tire is a long-lasting and damage-resistant RV tire that’s ideal for both short and long-distance usage. This innovative product is made with top-quality materials and features an amazing balance that minimizes bouncing.

Plus, at just 27 pounds, it’s easy to transport wherever you go. However, the tires are made in China, not the USA as the description says. And if you’re not happy with your purchase, they’ve got you covered with our quick delivery policy.

Pros
  • Long-lasting and damage-resistant
  • Made with top-quality materials
  • Minimizes bouncing
  • Easy to transport at only 27 pounds

Cons
  • Not made in the USA as advertised.

Maxxis No Wheel Durable M8008 ST Trailer Tire

It’s just a tire, right? WRONG! This is no ordinary tire. With a 10 ply rating, improved tread compound, and dual steel strap design, it can handle up to 2830 lbs of max load! Plus, the shock absorption will help keep your cargo safe and secure on those bumpy roads.

And with an ambient temperature of up to 118 degrees Fahrenheit, this bad boy can handle any terrain or climate you throw its way. So don’t wait any longer – order your Maxxis Tire today!

Pros
  • 2830 lbs of max load
  • Shock absorption
  • Operates in temperatures up to 118 degrees Fahrenheit

Cons
  • The mileage is only 20,000 miles.
  • The date code may be old.


Carlisle Vehicle HD Radial Tire-205/75R15 101M

Searching for a rugged and reliable radial tire that can handle all your heavy-duty driving needs? Then check out one more Carlisle product. This tough tire is specifically designed for vehicles that need to haul heavy loads.

With a height of 27.11 inches and a weight of just 22 pounds, this tire can take on anything you throw at it. Plus, the Carlisle uses load ratings to ensure that it can handle even the heaviest loads. But be aware that it’s not American-made but Chinese. So if you’re looking for a tire that can handle anything you throw at it, then Carlisle would be an ideal option.

Pros
  • Rugged and reliable
  • Haul heavy loads
  • 27.11 inches in height
  • 22 pounds

Cons
  • Not made in America
  • The load rating is not as high as some other brands.
  • Might be an old inventory.


Americana High-Speed Bias 1HP52 Loadstar Trailer Tire

Who says you can’t have a little bit of Americana in your life? With its high-speed bias tread pattern, this Loadstar Trailer Tire is perfect for anyone who wants to handle their business with aplomb.

Whether you’re hauling a load down the open road or just making your way through town, this tire will keep you moving with ease. And don’t worry about size; we’ve got you covered with our 205/65-10 option. The load range C means it can hold up to a fair amount of weight. You’ll be able to drive with ease at average speeds of 75, and even quicker if you need to! Plus, their fast shipping will get the tires to you quickly.

Pros
  • The high-speed bias tread pattern
  • Can handle a load range of C
  • 205/65-0 size option

Cons
  • The load capacity is not as high as some other brands.


Kenda Loadstar K550 Rubber Load Range C Trailer Tires

Do you need a tough and durable trailer tire that can handle heavy loads? Meet the Kenda RV Tires! This rubber tire is perfect for those who need to haul around a lot of gear, as it has a whopping capacity of 1,870 pounds.

Additionally, its six-ply rating means that it’s built to last even under tough conditions. Plus, with a rim size of 14 inches, this tire will fit almost any standard trailer wheel. So if you need a rugged and reliable tire that can handle anything you throw at it, the Kenda is a perfect choice!

Pros
  • 1870 pounds of maximum load capacity
  • Six-ply rating
  • 14-inch rim size

Cons
  • The date code may be old.
  • Might not be able to handle speed as well as some other brands.


RV Tires Buyers In-Depth Guide

RVing is a great way to see the country and spend time with family or friends. But one of the most important things to consider when RVing is your tires. In this guide, we’ll answer some common questions about RV tires and offer some tips on how to get the most out of your tires.

RV tires are different from regular passenger vehicle tires in a few ways. They are designed for long life and heavier loads. They also have a higher load index which means they can carry more weight per tire. And finally, they have a special tread design that helps evacuate water from under the tire to improve traction in wet weather. [1]

RV Tires Buyers In-Depth Guide

It can be a daunting task to find the best RV tires. Not only are there a lot of different brands and types of RV tires on the market, but there is also a lot of misinformation out there about what kind of tire is best for your RV. In this article, we aim to set the record straight and give you all the information you need to make an informed decision about which RV tires are right for you and your family.

What to Look for When Purchasing the Best RV Tires for Every Trip

No matter what type of RV owner you are, where you like to go, or how you like to get there, one thing is for sure – your tires are going to play a big role in your overall experience. That’s why it’s important to carefully consider all of your options before making a purchase.

When it comes to choosing the best RV tires for your needs, there are a few things you’ll want to keep in mind. First, think about the types of terrain you’ll be traveling on most often.

If you’re mostly sticking to paved roads, you’ll need a different tire than someone who likes to take their RV off-roading.

You’ll also want to consider the weight of your RV. The heavier your RV, the sturdier your tires will need to be. Finally, think about how often you’ll be using your RV. If you’re a full-time RVer, you’ll need tires that can withstand a lot of wear and tear. [2]

Most Motorhome Owners Will Benefit From Specialized RV Tires

RV tires are designed to provide a balance of smooth riding characteristics, load-carrying capacity, and durability. They typically have a load index and speed rating higher than passenger car tires. The increased load capacity is necessary to support the weight of an RV and its contents. A higher speed rating is required because RVs are often driven at highway speeds for long periods.

There are five main types of RV tires:

  • Pleasure-use tires
  • All-season or all-terrain tires
  • Commercial truck tires
  • LT tires
  • Special-trailer tires [3]

Let’s dive into each type so you can make an informed decision about which are the best RV tires for your needs.

Pleasure-Use Tires are Popular for Trips

Pleasure-use tires are the most common type of RV tire. They are designed for RVs that are used for vacations and occasional trips.

Most pleasure-use tires have a speed rating of 65 or higher and can carry a load up to 3415 pounds.
If you only use your RV a few times a year, pleasure-use tires may be all you need. They provide good performance at a reasonable price. However, if you use your RV more frequently or travel long distances, you may want to consider upgrading to all-season or all-terrain tires.

During Summertime Pick Up All-season Tires

All-season tires are intended to provide optimum control and traction in a wide range of conditions, including dry roads, wet roads, and even light snow. Although they are less expensive than dedicated winter or summer tires, they may not provide the same level of performance. If you do a lot of RVing in areas with harsh winters, you might want to consider investing in a set of winter tires.

During Summertime Pick Up All-season Tires

On the other hand, if you mostly stick to warmer climates or only use your RV during the summer months, all-season tires should be just fine. [4]

Here are a few things to keep in mind when shopping for all-season RV tires:

Tread life: All-season RV tires typically have longer tread lives than dedicated summer or winter tires. If you do a lot of driving, you might want to look for an all-season tire with a longer tread life.

Traction: All-season RV tires should provide excellent traction in both dry and wet circumstances. Nevertheless, they do fall short of providing as much traction as special winter or summer tires.

Price: All-season RV tires are typically more expensive than dedicated summer or winter tires. But if you spend a substantial amount of time in your vehicle, they can save you money in the long run by lasting longer.

If you’re looking for an all-purpose RV tire that can handle a variety of conditions, all-season tires are a good option. Just keep in mind that they may lack a high level of performance as other types of van tires. 

For Very Large Motorhomes, Commercial Truck Tires are a Fantastic Choice

Commercial truck tires are designed to handle heavy loads and provide good traction in a variety of conditions. They’re also built to last, so they can save you money in the long run.

If you have a large motorhome, commercial truck tires are a great option. Just keep in mind that they may be more expensive than other types of RV tires.

Here are a few things to keep in mind when shopping for commercial truck tires:

Load capacity: Commercial truck tires typically have higher load capacities than other types of RV tires. If you have a large motorhome, you’ll need tires that can handle the weight.

Tread life: Longer tread lives are typical in commercial truck tires, while other RV tires have shorter tread lives. If you spend a lot of time in your car, you may wish to search for tires with a long tread life.

Traction: In dry and wet situations, commercial truck tires should give good traction. But they cannot offer the same traction level as specialized winter or summer tires.

Price: Commercial truck tires are typically more expensive than other types of RV tires.

LT Tires Will Perfectly Suit Small RVs

If you have a small RV, then you’ll want to look into getting LT tires. These are designed for vehicles that don’t weigh more than 26,000 pounds. They’ll give you a smoother ride and improved handling. You can also get them in different tread patterns depending on your needs. [5]

Special-Trailer Tires are Best for Vans with a Fifth Wheel or Gooseneck

If you frequently tow a fifth wheel or gooseneck trailer, special-trailer tires are worth the investment. These tires have a deeper tread depth than standard passenger car tires and can better handle the heavyweight and constant turning of a trailer. They also typically have reinforced sidewalls to prevent bulging and blowouts.

Radial Tires vs Bias Tires

One question we get a lot is whether to buy radial or bias tires for their RV. The quick answer is that radial tires are almost always the better choice these days. Radial tires have many advantages over bias-ply tires, including longer tread life, improved fuel economy, increased towing capacity, and a smoother ride. Bias-ply tires are cheaper and may be fine if you don’t do much driving, but for most people, radials are the way to go. [6]

Finding the Correct Size RV Tire

The first step is finding the correct size tire for your RV. This can be tricky, as there are a lot of different sizes and types of RVs on the market. Luckily, there are a few ways to find the right size.

One way is to look in your RV owner’s manual. The manual should have specifications for the tires that came with your RV. If you can’t find your owner’s manual, or if you are unsure about the tire size, you can also look at the placard on the side of your RV door. The placard will have information about your RV’s weight capacity and tire size.

Load Capacity and Ply Ratings

The next thing you need to consider is the load capacity and ply rating of the tires. The maximum weight that a tire can support is determined by the load capacity, which measures how much weight it might carry. The ply number indicates the number of layers in the tire cord. The higher the ply rating, the stronger the tire.

For most RVs, you will want a tire with a load capacity of at least 2250 pounds and a ply rating of eight or higher. If you have a larger RV, you may need a tire with a higher load capacity. [9]

Load Capacity and Ply Ratings

You will also want to make sure that the tires you choose have a speed rating that is appropriate for your RV. The speed rating tells you how fast the tires can safely go. For most RVs, a tire with a speed rating of at least 65 mph is required.

Once you have considered the size, load capacity, and speed rating of the tires, you can begin to narrow down your options.

Sidewall Strength of Your RV Tires

The sidewall is the portion of the tire between the bead and the tread. It’s also what gives the tire its shape. The sidewall strength of your RV tires is important for two reasons: first because it helps to support the weight of your RV; and second, because it protects the inner workings of your tire from damage.

There are a few things to consider when assessing sidewall strength: ply rating, load range, and maximum inflation pressure.

Ply Rating is simply a measure of how many layers of fabric are used in the construction of the sidewall. The higher the ply rating, the stronger the sidewall. The load rating indicates how much weight a tire can bear. Again, the higher the load range, the stronger the sidewall. Finally, maximum inflation pressure is just what it sounds like: the highest amount of air pressure that can be safely put into your tires.

As you can see, there are a few factors to consider when assessing sidewall strength. However, as long as you keep these things in mind, you should have no problem finding strong RV tires for your rig.

Now that we’ve covered sidewall strength, let’s move on to tread design.

Tread Design

The tread is the part of the tire that actually touches the ground. It’s important to choose a tire with a tread design that suits your driving needs. For example, if you do a lot of off-roading in your RV, you’ll want a tire with a more aggressive tread design. On the other hand, if you mostly stick to paved roads, you can get away with a less aggressive tread design.

There are three main types of tread designs: all-terrain, mud-terrain, and highway. All-terrain tires are a good middle-of-the-road option. They provide good traction on both pavement and off-road surfaces. Mud-terrain tires are designed for driving in, well, mud! They have deep lugs and an aggressive tread pattern that helps to prevent them from getting stuck in the muck. Highway tires are designed for paved roads only. They don’t provide as much traction on off-road surfaces, but they’re much quieter on the road.

As you can see, there are a variety of tread designs to choose from. It’s important to select the right one for your driving needs.

Which RV Tire Class Is Right for You?

The next step is deciding which RV tire class is right for you. There are three main classes of RV tires:

Class A: Tires in this class are designed for large RVs, such as motorhomes and fifth wheels. They are more durable and quicker than other RV tires.

Class B: Tires in this class are designed for smaller RVs, such as travel trailers and pop-up campers. They have a lower load capacity and speed rating than Class A tires but will still provide good performance.

Class C: Tires in this class are designed for RVs that are used primarily for off-road camping or boondocking. They have a lower maximum load and speed rating than Class A tires. Also, they have improved traction and performance on muddy surfaces. [7]

Resistance to Moisture, Heat, and UV Rays

Another important consideration when choosing RV tires is resistance to moisture, heat, and UV rays. Tires that are resistant to these elements will last longer and perform better than those that are not.

When looking for tires that are resistant to moisture, heat, and UV rays, look for tires that are labeled as all-season or all-terrain. These tires are designed to withstand the rigors of driving in all types of weather and terrain.

All-season tires typically have a higher load capacity and speed rating than all-terrain tires. However, all-terrain tires will usually provide better traction in off-road conditions.

Why should you use RV Tires?

RV tires are designed for all types of weather and terrain. They have a special tread pattern that helps grip the road, even in slippery conditions. They’re also built to withstand the weight of a fully-loaded RV.

Most importantly, RV tires are made to last. With proper care and maintenance, they can easily last for tens of thousands of miles. That’s why it’s so important to choose the right RV tires for your needs.

What is the Best Way to Change RV Tires?

The best way to change RV tires is to have a professional do it for you. They will have the right tools and equipment to get the job done quickly and safely. However, if you’re feeling confident, you can always change them yourself. Just be sure to follow all the instructions in your owner’s manual.

Here’s a list of what you’ll need:

  • A jack
  • A lug wrench
  • A tire iron
  • A set of replacement tires
  • A friend (optional but highly recommended)

Once you have all the necessary tools, follow these steps to change your RV tires:

  • Park your RV on a level surface and set the parking brake. This will help keep it from moving while you’re changing the tires.
  • Put blocks under the wheels on the opposite side of the one you’re changing. This will keep your RV from rolling while you’re working on it.
  • Use the jack to lift the RV up until the tire is off the ground.
  • Remove the lug nuts with the lug wrench and set them aside.
  • Take the old tire off and put the new one on.
  • Put the lug nuts back on and tighten them as much as you can by hand.
  • Lower your RV back down to the ground and use the tire iron to finish tightening the lug nuts.
  • Repeat these steps for each tire that needs to be changed.

Once you’re finished, be sure to check all four tires to make sure they’re properly inflated. You can find this information in your owner’s manual or on a sticker inside your RV door panel. Proper tire inflation is essential for safe RVing. [8]

How Can I Keep My RV Tires Safe?

There are a few things you can do to keep your RV tires safe. First, be sure to check their pressure regularly. Tires can lose pressure for a variety of reasons, so it’s important to stay on top of it. You should also inspect your tires for any signs of damage or wear and tear. If you see anything that concerns you, have a professional take a look at it.

It’s also a good idea to invest in tire covers. These will protect your tires from the sun and other elements when you’re not using your RV. They’ll help extend the life of your tires and keep them looking like new.

Finally, be sure to follow all the manufacturer’s guidelines for care and maintenance. This includes things like the proper way to store your RV tires when you’re not using it.

Setting the Proper Tire Pressure for Your RV

One of the most important things you can do for your RV tires is to keep them properly inflated. This will help them last longer and perform better. But how do you know what the right pressure is?

The answer depends on a few factors, including the type of RV you have and the recommended tire pressure for your specific model. You can usually find this information in your owner’s manual or on a sticker inside your RV door panel.

Once you know the recommended tire pressure, use a tire gauge to check your tires’ current pressure. If they’re low, add air until they reach the proper level. If they’re high, let some air out until they’re at the correct pressure.

It’s also a good idea to check your tires’ pressure before every trip. This way you can catch any issues early and avoid problems down the road.

Consider Altitude & Temperature When Adjusting RV Tire Pressure

In addition to the manufacturer’s recommendations, you should also take altitude and temperature into account when setting your RV tire pressure.

Consider Altitude & Temperature When Adjusting RV Tire Pressure

As you gain elevation, the air gets thinner and your tires will lose some pressure. For every 1000 feet above sea level, you should add about two PSI to your tires.

Temperature can also affect your tires’ pressure. In general, cold weather will cause your tires to lose pressure while hot weather will make them gain pressure. So if it’s been a particularly cold or hot day, be sure to check your tires’ pressure and adjust accordingly. [10]

By following these tips, you can keep your RV tires in top shape and enjoy safe travels for years to come!

Weight is Crucial for RV Tires

The weight of your RV is one of the most important factors in choosing the right tires. That’s because your tires have to be able to support the entire weight of your RV, including any passengers or cargo.

If you have a light RV, you can usually get away with lighter-duty tires.

But if you have a heavy RV, you’ll need heavier-duty tires that can handle the extra weight.

You should also keep your RV’s weight distribution in mind when choosing tires. If most of the weight is concentrated in the front or back of the RV, you’ll need to pay special attention to those areas and make sure the tires are up to the task.

The best way to figure out what tires you need is to consult your RV’s owner manual. The manufacturer will have specific recommendations for the right tires based on your RV’s weight and design.

Once you’ve found the right tires, be sure to keep them properly inflated. This will help them last longer and perform better.

Pick Up a Tire Pressure Monitoring System (TPMS)

A Tire Pressure Monitoring System (TPMS) is a great way to keep an eye on your RV tires’ pressure. These devices attach to your tires and measure the pressure in real-time.

Some TPMS systems will even alert you if one of your tires is losing pressure. That way you can take care of the problem before it becomes a bigger issue.

There are a few different types of TPMS systems, so be sure to do some research and find the one that’s right for you. But regardless of which system you choose, a TPMS is a valuable tool for any RV owner.

By following these tips, you can buy the best RV tires for your needs and enjoy safe travels for years to come! [11]


FAQ

What is the typical life expectancy of an RV tire?

The typical life expectancy of an RV tire is three to five years. Of course, how you use and maintain your tires will affect their lifespan. For example, if you frequently travel on rough roads, your tires will wear out faster than if you stick to paved highways. Similarly, properly inflated and aligned tires will last longer than those that are neglected.

What are the consequences of driving on bald RV tires?

Bald RV tires can be extremely dangerous. They are more likely to fail suddenly, which could cause you to lose control of your vehicle. Additionally, bald tires offer less traction, so you may have difficulty braking or swerving to avoid an obstacle in the road. Ultimately, it is not worth risking your safety by driving on bald tires. If you are concerned that your tires may be balding, it is best to have them inspected by a professional.

How often should I check my RV tire pressure?

You should check your RV tire pressure at least once a month. However, it is best to check your tires more frequently if you are taking a long road trip or driving in extreme weather conditions. Additionally, it is important to check your tires before and after adding any weight to your vehicle, such as when you are loading up for a camping trip.

What are the most highly regarded trailer tires?

There are a few different brands that offer high-quality trailer tires. Some of the most popular options include Goodyear, Michelin, and Yokohama. When choosing trailer tires, it is important to consider the size and weight of your trailer as well as the type of terrain you will be driving on. For example, if you frequently travel off-road, you will need a different tire than if you stick to paved roads. Ultimately, it is best to consult with a professional to find the perfect tires for your needs.

How often should you replace your RV’s tires?

You should replace your RV’s tires every three to five years, or sooner if they are showing signs of wear. Additionally, it is important to inspect your tires regularly for any damage and have them serviced by a professional if necessary.

Is it true that Costco puts tires on motorhomes?

Yes, Costco offers a tire installation service for RVs. However, they do not install motorhome tires. Instead, they can install RV tires that are up to 26 inches in diameter. If you need help finding the right tires for your motorhome, it is best to consult with a professional.

How much does it cost to get new RV tires?

The cost of new RV tires varies depending on the size and type of tire you need. Additionally, the price will vary depending on where you purchase your tires and whether or not you have them installed by a professional. Generally speaking, you can expect to spend anywhere from $500 to $1000 on new RV tires.

What tires should I get for my travel trailer?

There are a few factors to consider when choosing the best tires for your travel trailer. The first is weight. Heavier trailers will need stronger, more durable tires than lighter models. The second is size. Make sure to get tires that are the right size for your rims and have enough load capacity for your trailer’s weight. The third is the terrain. If you’ll be doing a lot of off-roading, look for tires with deep treads and a good grip.

Finally, consider price and reviews when making your decision. Some brands are known for being high quality but also expensive, while others offer budget-friendly options without sacrificing too much in terms of quality. Read online reviews from other RVers to get an idea of what might work best for you.

What are tire ratings for RVs?

RV tires are rated according to load capacity and speed. The load rating is how much weight the tire can support, while the speed rating is the maximum speed the tire can travel safely. Most RV tires have a load capacity of around 3500-4000 pounds and a speed rating of 65 mph.

What is the typical speed rating for most trailer tires?

Most trailer tires have a speed rating of 65 mph. However, some tires are rated for higher speeds, up to 81 mph. If you’re looking for a tire that can handle higher speeds, be sure to check the speed rating before making your purchase.

What is the most important factor to consider when choosing RV tires?

The most important factor to consider when choosing RV tires is the load capacity. You’ll want to make sure that the tires you select can safely support the weight of your RV and all your gear. Consider the maximum weight that the stroller can support before purchasing.

What can I do to extend the life of my RV tires?

One of the best ways to extend the life of your RV tires is to perform regular maintenance on them. This means checking the air pressure and tread depth regularly, and having them professionally inspected at least once a year. Additionally, you can help protect your tires from premature wear by avoiding driving on rough or unpaved roads whenever possible. Finally, make sure to store your RV in a cool, dry place when it’s not in use – extreme heat or cold can damage tires over time.

By following these simple tips, you can help keep your RV tires in good condition for many years to come.

How long do Goodyear endurance trailer tires last, and what are the benefits?

On average, Goodyear endurance trailer tires last around 50,000 miles. That’s quite a bit longer than most passenger car or light truck tires. The benefits of having Goodyear endurance trailer tires are many. They provide reliable traction and handling in both wet and dry conditions, they have a long tread life, and they resist chipping and tearing on rough roads. In addition, Goodyear endurance trailer tires are backed by one of the largest tire manufacturers in the world.

So if you’re looking for a dependable tire that will give you years of trouble-free service, look no further than Goodyear endurance trailer tires. You won’t be disappointed.

What are some tips for proper RV tire care?

Proper RV tire care is essential to extend the life of your tires and get the most out of them. Here are a few tips:

  • Inflate your tires to the proper pressure. This can be found in your owner’s manual or on the door placard.
  • Check your tire pressure regularly, at least once a month.
  • Rotate your tires every 6000 miles or so. This will help evenly distribute wear and tear.
  • If you notice any unusual tread wear or damage, have it checked out by a professional as soon as possible.
  • Be sure to store your RV in a cool, dry place when not in use. extremes of heat and cold can damage your tires.

Following these simple tips will help you get the most out of your RV tires and enjoy years of trouble-free service.

What is the optimal psi for my RV tires?

The optimal psi for your RV tires depends on a few factors. The first is the weight of your RV. Heavier RVs will require higher tire pressures. The second factor is the type of terrain you’ll be driving on. If you’re mostly sticking to highways and paved roads, you can get away with lower tire pressures. But if you’re venturing off-road, you’ll need to inflate your tires to a higher pressure to prevent them from getting damaged by rocks and other debris.

You can find the specific tire pressure recommendations for your RV in your owner’s manual or on the door placard. Once you know the optimal psi for your RV tires, be sure to check the pressure regularly and inflate them as needed.

What are the best RV tires for winter?

The best RV tires for winter depend on a few factors. The first is the weight of your RV. Heavier RVs will require stronger, more durable tires that can handle the extra weight. The second factor is the type of terrain you’ll be driving on. If you’re mostly sticking to highways and paved roads, you can get away with all-season tires. But if you’re venturing off-road or into heavy snow, you’ll need winter-specific tires that are designed to provide traction in slippery conditions.

What is the cost of a Camper tire?

The cost of a Camper tire varies depending on the size and type of tire you need. In general, smaller tires will be less expensive than larger ones. All-season tires will also be less expensive than winter-specific or off-road tires. You can expect to pay anywhere from $50 to $200 for a single Camper tire.

What’s the distinction between an ST tire and an LT tire?

ST tires are designed for shorter trips and lighter loads while LT tires are made for longer hauls and heavier loads. Both have different load capacities and speed ratings. What is the load capacity? The load capacity is how much weight the tire can carry. RV tires have a higher load capacity than passenger car tires. The speed rating is the maximum speed the tire can handle safely. An “S” rating means 112 mph and an “L” rating means 87 mph.

Useful Video: Best RV Tires | RV Expertise

In Conclusion

We hope you enjoyed this article and found it helpful in your search for the best RV tires. If you have any questions or comments, please feel free to leave them below. And be sure to check back often as we continue to update this guide with new products and information. 

If you liked this article, please share it with your friends or family who might also find it useful. Also, don’t miss out on our other Epic Buying Guides for more great product suggestions. 

Thanks for reading!


References:

  1. https://trailervalet.com/what-is-the-difference-between-trailer-tires-vs-regular-car-tires/
  2. https://www.tires-easy.com/blog/guide-to-buying-rv-tires/
  3. https://www.getawaycouple.com/rv-tires/
  4. https://www.bridgestonetire.com/learn/shop/winter-snow-tires-vs-all-season-tires/
  5. https://www.firestonecompleteautocare.com/blog/tires/differences-light-truck-passenger-tires/
  6. https://americanatire.com/differences-between-radial-and-bias-tires/
  7. https://www.tires-easy.com/blog/guide-to-buying-rv-tires/
  8. https://togorv.com/rv-living/how-to-change-flat-tire/
  9. https://www.mortonsonthemove.com/rv-weight/
  10. https://www.tirerack.com/tires/tiretech/techpage.jsp?techid=167
  11. https://www.bridgestonetire.com/learn/maintenance/tire-pressure-monitoring-system-how-tpms-works/